Review: Timebomb

timebombBy Scott K. Andrews

Hodder, out now

Three youngsters are drawn together across time and find themselves caught in a millennia-spanning conflict…

In the first novel in his new trilogy, Scott Andrews doesn’t hesitate to throw in as many complications regarding time travel as he possibly can, with people turning up at different points in their own timelines, questions of predestination and free will, and potential Grandfather paradoxes.

With the exception of a handful of interludes (which no doubt will help to clarify the overall story, but which actually muddy the waters further at this stage), most of the story is told from the points of view of the three time travellers – Yojana Patel from 2141, Kaz Cecka from the present day (which is referred to as both 2013 and 2014 – which may be a clue to what’s going on?), and Dora Predennick from 1640. Each adapts in their own way to the mysteries surrounding them, with the seventeenth century girl coping in many ways better than the other two – although given the hints we get about events to come, we’re obviously going to focus more on them in the sequels.

The story is told at a breakneck pace, which is appropriate for the tale, and Andrews provides snippets of description as required, particularly during the travels through time when the characters only experience a location for a few seconds. This leanness occasionally means that our heroes recognise a location quicker than the reader but I have no doubt that somewhere Scott Andrews has a load of diagrams with arrows curving forward and back to ensure that all the various elements tie up properly – even if his villains seem intent on breaking the pattern!

Verdict: An enjoyable time travel thriller with some unpredictable twists. 8/10

Paul Simpson

Click here to order Timebomb from Amazon.co.uk

Discussion

One thought on “Review: Timebomb

  1. > I have no doubt that somewhere Scott Andrews has a load of diagrams with arrows curving forward and back to ensure that all the various elements tie up properly

    Flow charts. Colour-coded flow charts. Endless bloody colour-coded flow charts. #neveragain ;-)

    Posted by Scott K. Andrews (@ScottKAndrews) | October 15, 2014, 10:30 am

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